All posts by Grant Watson

Grant Watson is an Australian film critic and writer. He lives in Melbourne.

REVIEW: Crackerjack (2002)

Jack Simpson (Mick Molloy) is a Melbourne slacker who uses three bowling club memberships to score cheap parking in the city's inner south - and to rent parking spaces to his workmates. When he is unexpectedly called up to attend the club and bowl competitively, he finds an unfamiliar world of cheap beer and aged ...

REVIEW: The Curtain Rises (2015)

Saori (Momota Kanako) is an under-confident high school senior pushed by her peers into becoming the new captain of the school drama club. While she struggles to lead a group of enthusiastic young women into competing in the national drama championships, she receives unexpected help from the school's new teacher (Kuroki Haru) - who turns ...

REVIEW: Season of the Witch (2011)

In the early 14th century, two knights (Nicolas Cage and Ron Perlman) fleeing from the Crusade are given a choice: face justice for their desertion, or escort an accused witch to a remote monastery in order to be judged. Accompanied on their journey by a priest, a trader, and a young aspiring knight, they soon ...

REVIEW: The Man (2017)

Simon (Søren Malling) is a hugely successful fine artist living in Copenhagen. There he runs a workshop of young artists assisting him in producing his works, with a devoted wife (Ane Dahl Torp) and a not-so-secret mistress (Sus Wilkins). When his estranged adult son Casper (Jakob Oftebro) turns up on his doorstep - one who ...

REVIEW: Winter of Discontent (2012)

Art has always been a powerful tool for political discourse, and cinema is clearly no different from any other medium. Ibrahim El Batout's 2012 drama Winter of Discontent is a strong example of that. It depicts the chain of events in 2011 that started with protests in Cairo's Tarhir Square and snowballed until they forced the resignation ...

REVIEW: Whiskey Tango Foxtrot (2016)

Whiskey Tango Foxtrot was a box office flop in 2016, promoted widely as a laugh-out-loud comedy starring Tina Fey (30 Rock) and Margot Robbie (I, Tonya) but generating complete disinterest among audiences and disappointment among critics. The actual film is hardly a comedy at all, of course, and simply employs satirical elements to express its cynicism ...